Monthly Archive for: ‘March, 2017’

Regime Wages War of Documents on Syrians

Regime Wages War of Documents on Syrians

In recent years, just as political oppression has reached new heights, including war crimes and the proliferation of prohibited weapons, corruption has also increased and is used as a tool of war against the opposition, and a massive source of war-generated income at the expense of the population in general.

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Women’s Activist: Rojava Laws a Dream Turned Reality

Women’s Activist: Rojava Laws a Dream Turned Reality

The Kurdish PYD is a totalitarian ideological party that doesn’t accept other views, but it managed to take the first step towards the emancipation of women.

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Intellectuals Share Insights on Revolution’s Sixth Anniversary

Intellectuals Share Insights on Revolution’s Sixth Anniversary

On the sixth anniversary of the revolution, SyriaUntold asked four Syrian intellectuals and artists who have been part of the revolution since its beginning to share their insights about the current situation.

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Agency and Hope: Helping Communities Healing Themselves

Agency and Hope: Helping Communities Healing Themselves

Opposition-linked self-organizing councils could be a primary partner in fortifying mental health resiliency in affected communities.

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Do Alawis Want to Fully Become Shia Offshoot?

Do Alawis Want to Fully Become Shia Offshoot?

On the Syrian coast, the diffusion of Shia proselitism stirs up mixed feelings in the local Alawi community.

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The Virtual Land of Social Media for Dispersed Syrians

The Virtual Land of Social Media for Dispersed Syrians

Many projects have been launched to substitute and expand the social networks that previously provided support to those living in the same area.

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Where Do We Meet? Mobility for an Exiled Nation

Where Do We Meet? Mobility for an Exiled Nation

For the lucky ones that reside in countries that have granted them a legal status that allows them to travel abroad, the question of “where do we meet?” has become predominant.

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